Burn Baby Burn – Rashes

alexas fotos

All rashes have three things in common – they burn, they are painful, they are super annoying – and the majority of them are preventable. I’ll do prevention information in a different post, but here is what to do when you already have a rash.

When you have rashes from exercise, you should really start thinking like a momma, because the fastest way to manage skin that is irritated, red and painful, is actually diaper rash cream. Zinc oxide is a rash’s worst enemy. Many athletes suffer from rashes in armpits, groins, and thighs, and diaper cream works in all of those areas. Plus, we love it for rash relief more than just slathering it in Vaseline.

Here are a few other tips for those of you dealing with rashes on the trail:

Start early – Of course you want to stop whatever is irritating it, but you want to get that area covered with healing creams ASAP.

Use Synthetic fibers – Also if the area is going to continue to rub, you want to throw away the idea that you want cotton on top of it because of how soft cotton can feel. What you want is something synthetic that will keep that area moving without friction.

Cube it – If you are on the trail and don’t have diaper cream in your medic kit, the sure-fire trick to give immediate relief is an ice cold compress. It will stop the immediate pain and burn, and reduce the swelling.

Stay cool – When the athlete leaves to go home, do remind them that hot water will really make it burn, so a hot tub would actually be pure misery.

Rest – Rashes really respond to just having time to be NOT irritated and will heal in just a day.

Trail well.

Yes, I Will Open Your Bottle For You – How Support Can Help an Athlete’s State of Mind

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One of the things that I remind people who are dealing with athletes is, that when athletes are stressed, not only are their brains not working, but neither are their little sausage fingers…AT ALL!

Trying to open something that requires grip strength, or a little package, is just insanely impossible. For the athlete, not only are they going to spill it, but it’s just a reminder that their body is NOT working the way it normally does.

Messages of “what is not working” is something that we never want to induce or even allow to come through that athlete’s thought process while they are refueling. They are battling a complete boardroom of ideas that the brain turns on to already stop the madness. The brain turns itself into a diligent reporter on bad news when you get to testing your body to its fullest, and it will find a million ways to tell you that you should stop, that this is going poorly, and that you aren’t strong enough to do this.

And then you pull over to the roadside and your stupid hands don’t work either… damn.

I try to remind those athletes about where their head should be during this time on the trail, and what they should be thinking about.  I will have them notice that their gait is strong, or their form is firm.

Trail Drivers can also help them notice things they DO HAVE power over.

How’s your annoyance, do you think you need some salt? Is your stomach queasy, do you need something to get it to stop rumbling? Try this Papaya it is a super-specific tool to help tummies that feel upset gain calmness. I have used it in every country I have been in. Are you having tension on your shoulders, we can ice that down for immediate relief. The fact is that failure IS part of the endurance training, but it can usually be hacked while on the course.

So, let me open that bottle for you so you can keep your focus on what is our next hack to keep you going.  Trail Drivers can be a superpower to have as a partner.

Trail well.

Bruises That Worry

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Mountains are dirty and full of rocks. That makes them hard on people who are moving at great speeds to complete a course because any misstep can cause a fall.

When you have athletes that are training in mountainous regions, I always remind people that mountains are made of ROCKS.

Yes ROCKS, and rocks can kill people, even nice, cute people. Depending on if you are in a volcanic mountain or other type of mountain, let’s just agree that all mountains are full of rock.

Rocks get caught up in stuff, they also really hurt and always break skin when you fall on them.  Rocks can cause crazy bruises. Bruises are like a scab on the inside, and you will know instantly when you’re about to bruise the living crap out of your leg, because it will turn color quickly.

If it looks like the bruise on a large muscle group is going to be under the size of a fist, as the Trail Driver I really don’t worry that much. But, if it looks like it is more like the size of my hand if it were open (with all fingers) or larger, I’m definitely going to start to worry.

Bruising that instantly turns black is also not a good sign. Bumps that immediately show a raised “nugget” like a head bump means I will pull the athlete from the course.

It is best to remind all athletes of the rules around safety in advance, so they know IN ADVANCE what accidents will pull them off the course. “Please avoid head injuries” is not enough information…

If your athlete gets injured, ask the person to tell you about the fall and the type of impact. Was it jagged or smooth, was it a deeper punch or just a pancake splat?  Weight falls at 2 ½ times its weight, so a 200-pound male is falling at 500 pounds of force and 500 pounds of force on a spleen is never a good plan.

If you are sending them back, have a medic check them in route and make a back-up plan if the pain gets worse. If they puke after a pancake splat, they need to go right to medical, because this is now a trauma sign.

Best option, pay attention to rocks, tell your team to pay attention to rocks, and NEVER, NEVER trust rocks to stay in place. Nothing outsmarts gravity.

Trail well.

 

The Trail Driver – The Spiritually Driven Athlete – Part 2

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Trail Drivers are those who support athletes so that they can do great things. Trail Drivers allow athletes to be better by helping them have resources while they’re doing things that are incredibly physical. Sometimes that’s logistics, a supply vehicle, or encouragement.

This is a two-part post reviewing how to support those athletes that I call “spiritually driven athletes,” those unique athletes that are called by some special circumstances to do something BIG, like doing a long event to raise awareness for a cause.

These are not the average athletes that are just training to do a specific distance. These are athletes that will be on the road over a series of days doing parts of their challenge over a long part of road. The majority of the time they will be their own support, MacGyver to medic, and they are going to have a ton of time in their own mind. Having a ton of time in your own mind can be great for the first 3 to 5 days, but after 30 days it gets a little dreary and weary.

The role of a Trail Driver, even if they are across the country, is also to make sure that they can help that person manage all of the details that it will take to keep them safe on their journey, supported with the items that they need, and pick them up if there is need. A great Trail Driver can help remove obstacles and put resources to that athlete very quickly.

Mapping is your number one tool. Physical maps are needed on journeys over 50 miles. You will need to see, on one piece of paper, the beginning and the end of that journey, and to be able, long-term, to see how far you’ve traveled. You will need to utilize every form of mapping, Geo location, with a smart phone, and Google maps to identify the physical building that they may need to find. “I’ll meet you at the old post office that’s on the corner of Main and First, and it’s right next to a service station so you “I’ll meet you in the small town.” Mapping does something magical, it allows someone to find out where they are, where they’re going and how much time it will take them, especially when their brain isn’t working right.

Put a map printout at the bottom of their rucksack, and one that they can pull out and use all the time. Losing a single piece of paper is probable. Another tip is to set up the “Find My Phone” application so you can actually Geo locate the phone and you don’t have to call that athlete to be able to find them.

Let someone in that town know you’re coming. Call ahead to either an organization that matches the cause, or a city official. They are going to want to know information; the cause, the name and the information about the person, and approximate times to look out for them. Sometimes I do this so when that day comes, people don’t think this is a crazy vagrant that they have to be fearful of, and sometimes it’s just so they can keep an extra eye out to make sure they don’t get hit on a country road. In small towns across America I have found that having something exciting happen, seeing someone with a dream or that is taking on a challenge to do something greater, is worth coming out for!

Texting is still a tool that allows for people to connect. There will be many times where that person may not be eligible to get that text because of cell service, but at some point they will, and will be glad they have it. If it’s been particularly long and lonely on the road, they’ll gladly interface with it.

Food and types of food matter. You are going to need to have that person focus on anti-inflammatory foods. They, over a series of days will have aches in places they never knew could ache. Orange juice or pineapple juice are foods that they should get to know. There are plenty of menus online that will give you simple items that you can add into their food groups to keep the inflammation down.

Protein is a tool, not just a trend. Having protein to keep muscles building and repairing themselves is going to be critical. A protein-based final meal is going to be a critical tool and how they will recover over the 10-12 hours of being on the road. Their body will want foods that sustain it during the peak hours of exertion, but in their resting state it is going to need all of the energy can get to repair all of the parts of the body that were stressed during the day.

Focus only on the goal for the day. Be the voice of reason. Every day actually has a goal, and every goal has a time that it is completed. When things are feeling boring, overwhelming, or just plain too much, let them know how far they’ve come, how much further they will get in the day, or give them information that will help them locate and find where they’re supposed to be and when in the days going forward.

Editing the rucksack. If they are on a long journey that is over months, you will need to edit the rucksack, and change out any gear that is no longer functional. If that person is a solo athlete, you can actually send gear to a hotel along the way and have it ready for them. I have found that hotels are incredibly helpful, if the athlete is camping and sleeping outside, even the campsite can traditionally get deliveries.

Invite others to the task. If your athlete is covering a lot of physical terrain it is incredibly helpful to invite people to meet them on that terrain at various times and give those people a task. Can you bring extra water? Pack something and meet them there. Those athletes don’t have to have someone with them all the time, but having someone check in with them daily for even as little as 20 minutes will help them keep their sanity on the journey.

In order for people to do great things, they don’t need just courage, they need thoughtful, consistent and persistent support. For those of you who are that support, I personally thank you for making the world a better place.

Trail Well.

Managing Blood Flow in the Body

redistributionofbloodflow www.learn.sdstate.edu

If you are doing a repetitive sport for hours on end, every athlete will have places on their body where blood will start to pool, and those places will need to get moving so that the body can function at a higher performance long term.  

Commonly affected areas are hands, legs and feet. Blood pooling in these areas will not only change the circulation in the body, but it will also be a ticket to stiffness both that day and the next day. 

It’s helpful to simply put an athlete in a different stretching position that allows gravity to escort the blood to a new place, or rest the athlete in a different position, or have them choose to switch athletic gear. 

A common question to ask is “Are there any areas of your body that are feeling a little numb?”

If this is a seasoned athlete they will naturally move to try to free up that area for movement.  

One of the easiest items to try is to get that athlete in a reclining position and let gravity work on their behalf. 

The body is an efficient tool and usually will redistribute blood within five minutes. 

As always, pay attention to your athletes and give them as many medical alert tools as you can before the event so that they can participate in their own care.

Sharing blogs like this so that they can watch for their own signs of distress is almost like having a race prep meeting! 

Trail well.

Image courtesy of http://www.learn.sdstate.edu

Stress Fractures Are Annoying and Preventable!

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Over the years I have met a ton of endurance athletes, and one thing that they all have in common is their own personal list of annoying injuries. Many people have a war story to go with each injury on that list.

All you have to do is say to an endurance athlete “pulled hammie” and you will watch their whole body scrunch in reaction to how painful that is in real life and how annoying it is to manage the recovery.

Stress fractures not only hurt, but they are traditionally really annoying because it takes so long to heal bones. Hobbling around on crutches, keeping legs elevated, or having an inability to put weight on that region for any athlete is super-duper, big sigh, frustrated kind of annoying.

Taking steps in advance of an endurance event to avoid stress fractures is the “pay attention” advice for the athletes reading this article. This blog series is really focused on the things that happen on the trail and how a support team is going to react to those events, so I will focus on what to do after the injury has occurred.

The chances of a stress fracture for endurance athletes is high, especially for athletes that are pushing their muscles to the very limit. A normal athlete has between a two and 20% chance of having a stress fracture. An endurance athlete will most likely have one at least one in their personal list.

The reason a stress fracture happens is the muscles themselves become too tired to do the work. In order to pick up the impact of the work being performed that the muscles can’t manage, it directs that stress to the bones.

The majority of stress fractures that I have seen on the road really happen in the areas of the feet and the legs.

The athlete will know that they have a fracture because they have a pain that is traditionally getting worse, it will have a lot of swelling, and it may end up with a slight bit of bruising, but it will be first noticeable by pain. You’ll also know it’s a fracture when the pain is reduced as soon as any weight is lifted from the area or it will  immediately start to feel better from rest, and then spurs back as soon as motion or weight is applied to that area.

The hop test- have the athlete hop on the one side where the pain is. A stress fracture will deliver a pinpoint sharp pain.

Your best option is always to STOP-REST-ICE. If you are a trail driver, 100% of the time my advice is to have the athlete pulled off the course, and I will tell you very few athletes want to be pulled from the course. They will endure huge amounts of pain to not leave the course.

My advice to the athlete in a situation like this is to give them as much information as you can about where you think their injury is or where it is heading. Invite them to discontinue what they’re doing if it is causing them pain. In this case if it is a fracture they could actually double the amount of time that they will be unable to perform and be recovering.

Because this type of pain can often look like many other things that are not as critical, like shin splints, you really need to pay attention to the swelling, and how the pain changes when the area has weight taken off of it. When you have pain that is in the muscle tissues, it will start off REALLY screaming. If it is a bone pain, it will get progressively more painful as they move.

There are many athletes that will choose to continue on and bull their way through a stress fracture just to meet those goals. For those crazies, try to wrap the area tightly, give ibuprofen and a sturdy warning. That is all I can offer that will be accepted.

I will leave you with an odd fact, and that is if your athlete was also an athlete as a child, orthopedically they are less likely to get a stress fracture as an adult. And that has to do with the placement of the hip being different in athletic development of children.

Here is that random fact link.

Trail well.

Elevation Burns

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When you are trail driving in areas that have high elevation and a lot of sun you’ll want to watch out for elevation burning.

It is also called sun poisoning, but it’s where you see (usually on the arms of an athlete) what looks like sunburn but has teeny white dots in it. Those white dots will be right underneath the skin and may have a little bit of topographical texture to them. Traditionally I see this in higher elevations, but it means that the athlete needs immediate complete sunblock and burn treatment.

I have a tool that I use that is in a tube form called “Rescue Remedy.” It is available at Whole Foods everywhere, or multiple places online. It is a homeopathic treatment that is especially good for burns. If you are taking notes, buy some and keep it in your medic kit at home for burns that happen on the stove. I am not kidding, this stuff is magic!

You want to slather it on that burn as soon as you see it and let it do its job. It will be the difference between blistering and not blistering.

If you have Rescue Remedy, I would apply it immediately and let it soak into that skin as many times as it can. The first application will melt into the skin. You want to apply it until it doesn’t immediately melt anymore and it’s got a white top finish. As soon as that slow sinking white top layer gets melted in (it may take about a minute) then you want to apply sunblock over that.

That should do the trick for the rest of the day, unless they are sweating off their sun block. Be very gentle when touching this area and remind them to not scratch. Scratching will make those white bumps that are actually a kind of blister pop up to the top.

Trail well.