Preventing Rashes on the Trail

wokandapix2

Heat rash, chub rub, and wardrobe malfunctions are all things that inspire rashes, as well as things that athletes are allergic to, like ground cover.

Here are some real basic tips to keep in mind.

Heat rash – The number one cause of heat rash is overdressing. The number two cause is wearing cloth that keeps heat in and doesn’t wick away moisture. A simple wardrobe change can help heat rash immediately from getting worse. Synthetic fibers are also a tool in that rash area because it will help keep the rash dry.

Chub rub – The thing about chub rub is that meaty skin (thighs) are irritated and need more friction in that area, not less. Look for wardrobe items that will keep any smooshy parts of you available to have lots of smooth friction on them, that’s why great exercises pants have lots of spandex! Having high performance gear is not just about having high-quality, it’s about having functional materials on a body in movement.

Lube it homestyle – Put preventative salve on areas that are problematic before you dress. Things that stick out, rub. So nipples, bone areas, and areas that fold, (like a groin) are all areas that are available to have preventative petroleum products rubbed on them.

Nip it – There is a reason also why so many people use Band-Aids over their nipples – it’s to keep them protected and smooth, but it is also to keep that area free from friction and encourage movement. Bleeding nipples can happen on every single athlete year round.

Scrub protection – If you are going to have areas of your body that are exposed to the elements that may include brush, rocks, or other things that can graze the skin to open it, you may want to put protective socks or a light covering in that area. Tall socks can be stylish.

Plan ahead – Knowing the terrain that the athlete will be performing in allows the Trail Driver to keep items in stock that will help the performance of that athlete. That knowledge also helps the athlete preplan their wardrobe.

I do want to just sign off for all of you who have ever gone out of your way to help those athletes become superstars, you are the key to help them get to the finish line!

Trail well.

Burn Baby Burn – Rashes

alexas fotos

All rashes have three things in common – they burn, they are painful, they are super annoying – and the majority of them are preventable. I’ll do prevention information in a different post, but here is what to do when you already have a rash.

When you have rashes from exercise, you should really start thinking like a momma, because the fastest way to manage skin that is irritated, red and painful, is actually diaper rash cream. Zinc oxide is a rash’s worst enemy. Many athletes suffer from rashes in armpits, groins, and thighs, and diaper cream works in all of those areas. Plus, we love it for rash relief more than just slathering it in Vaseline.

Here are a few other tips for those of you dealing with rashes on the trail:

Start early – Of course you want to stop whatever is irritating it, but you want to get that area covered with healing creams ASAP.

Use Synthetic fibers – Also if the area is going to continue to rub, you want to throw away the idea that you want cotton on top of it because of how soft cotton can feel. What you want is something synthetic that will keep that area moving without friction.

Cube it – If you are on the trail and don’t have diaper cream in your medic kit, the sure-fire trick to give immediate relief is an ice cold compress. It will stop the immediate pain and burn, and reduce the swelling.

Stay cool – When the athlete leaves to go home, do remind them that hot water will really make it burn, so a hot tub would actually be pure misery.

Rest – Rashes really respond to just having time to be NOT irritated and will heal in just a day.

Trail well.

Managing Rapid Temperature Change

free photos3

Mountains are beautiful, but they also take a beastly toll on your temperature gauge.

This last week I had athletes that were in the Siskiyou mountains, and at the base of those mountains the temperature was a beautiful 70°. By the time we changed our elevation we were at about 36°.

Among the things to pack for your athletes are the tools that they will need when the temperature rapidly changes. When they are going upward and the climate is getting colder, they will need more layers available to them to add, and they will need to cool off from sweat before they put those new layers on or you will just smother the wetness against their skin and they’ll be even colder.

If you are going downward to a lower elevation, you need to prepare your athletes for the possibility that they are going to need to strip off the gear on their descent and how to get that gear to the stations and tagged so they can get it back at the end.

Adding a simple safety pin to each layer of clothing allows the Trail Drivers to just tag it and bag it. If the temp is cooling quickly you will want to give your athletes warm broth (lots of yummy salt) or even a mild green tea to help in calming the tummy.

In rapid temperature changes where it gets colder fast, you will also see a lot more muscle cramps, so be prepared for that. People naturally start to clench up to fight the beastly environment. Cold, when it is mixed with WET, is deadly, so don’t underestimate the importance of dry gear.

A Trail Driver is a crucial tool in keeping the team healthy and on track. If you are an athlete, find a great one. If you are the one who supports crazy ultra-athletes, be aware of how many ways you can help those people attain their goals.

Trail well.